nyctophxilia:

thedeathoftheparty:

So come with me I’ll buy you a raincoat
Stay with me I’m sick of this shameful
Head of mine, I’m lost in its tangles
I need you on my garments.

perfection

(via palestseas)

untrustyou:

Hendrik Schwartz
The only ray of light from a Pyongyang apartment block. 

untrustyou:

Hendrik Schwartz

The only ray of light from a Pyongyang apartment block. 

(via basiumis)

After working in the tertiary industry you discover three things;

• The general public are a group of fucking idiots.
• There’s too many people in the world.
• Never work in the tertiary industry ever again.

art-of-swords:

Saber with Scabbard

  • Dated: 19th century
  • Culture: Turkish
  • Medium: steel, gold, gilt brass, diamonds, emeralds, pearls
  • Measurements: overall length 39 3/4 inches (100.97 cm)
  • Provenance: Sultan Murad V

The most important ceremony in the inauguration of many Islamic rulers was the investiture with a sword, rather than a crown. This extravagantly decorated saber traditionally is said to have been refitted in 1876 for the investiture of the Ottoman sultan Murad V (reigned May 30–August 31, 1876).

He suffered a nervous breakdown before the ceremony and subsequently was deposed and kept a prisoner until his death in 1904. The sword was probably assembled by a court jeweler, using a seventeenth-century Iranian blade, an eighteenth-century Indian jade grip, and gem-studded gold and gilt-brass mounts of contemporary workmanship.

The emerald near the top of the scabbard opens to reveal a secret compartment containing a gold coin marked with the name of Süleyman the Magnificent (1494–1566), the most powerful Ottoman ruler of the sixteenth century. The underside of the emerald is inscribed with the phrase “According to God’s will.”

Source: Copyright 2014 © The Metropolitan Museum of Art

sadmusicforsadbastards:

"So why don’t you love me back?"

(via lv-kt)

birdfingers:

Sigur Rós cover The Rains of Castamere for Season 4 of HBO’s Game Of Thrones

And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
that Lord of Castamere,
But now the rains weep o’er his hall,
with no one there to hear.
Yes now the rains weep o’er his hall,
and not a soul to hear.
I want to hug every fennel fox.

I want to hug every fennel fox.

(Source: animal-pandemonium)

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green. 
Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more. [Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

turtlesanddragons:

fandomsarelikesex:

the-butt-prince-ike:

tastefullyoffensive:

Coloring Book Corruptions

Related: Hipster Dinosaurs

ok i’ve been staring at the one with Goofy and Pluto for like 10 minutes now and still don’t get it. Someone more clever or less innocent explain?

should i tell him

I don’t get it either D:

Whatever you want it to be

(via ijustdontfeellikeagrownupyet)

(via x-c-v-b)

griimees:

Arctic Monkeys - 505

griimees:

Arctic Monkeys - 505

(via jawxbreaker)

caesaretluna:

"nope"

- everyone

(via basiumis)

spaceplasma:

Ganymede and Callisto are similar in size and are made of a similar mixture of ice and rock, but data from the Galileo and Voyager spacecraft show that they look different at the surface and on the inside. Just like Earth and Venus, Ganymede and Callisto are twins, and understanding how they were born the same and grew up to be so different is of tremendous interest to planetary scientists.

Ganymede and Callisto’s evolutionary paths diverged about 3.8 billion years ago during the Late Heavy Bombardment, the phase in lunar history dominated by large impact events. Impacts during this period melted Ganymede so thoroughly and deeply that the heat could not be quickly removed. All of Ganymede’s rock sank to its center the same way that all the chocolate chips sink to the bottom of a melted carton of ice cream. Callisto received fewer impacts at lower velocities and avoided complete melting. Ganymede is closer to Jupiter and therefore is hit by twice as many icy impactors as Callisto, and the impactors hitting Ganymede have a higher average velocity.

Image Credit: NOAA/GSD

(Source: swri.org, via sagansense)

sagansense:

retromantique:

One of the most stressful thoughts for me is that of knowing it’s not possible to read all the best books in one lifetime. So many life-altering, mind-changing books are bound to be missed.

Isn’t it mortifying to think of?

I THINK ABOUT THIS EVERY. SINGLE. DAY.